You may have been involved in a serious crash with a driver who ran a red light in New Mexico. What you may not know is that many red light-running crashes end much worse. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says that in 2016, more than 800 people died in red-light-running crashes. When it compared large cities that have red light cameras installed to those large cities without cameras, it found that the former saw 21% fewer fatalities in this regard.

Benefits of red-light cameras

The benefits don’t end there. Red-light cameras can reduce the number of red light-running violations by around 40%. By taking photographs of those who violate the law and allowing the police to send them a ticket afterwards, it acts as a good deterrent.

Yet the number of red light cameras has been declining. In 2012, 533 communities had them. In 2018, only 421 did. Incidentally, red light-running crash fatalities rose 17% in that time period.

Why cameras are declining

The reason for this decline is simple. Some cities are taking advantage of cameras as a source for more revenue by installing them everywhere and shortening the yellow lights. As a result, there has been a loss of public support. Some camera programs don’t involve the public as much as they need to, and this can be alienating.

Legal representation for crash victims

Cameras can do a lot to prevent motor vehicle accidents, but you’ve been injured all the same. Personal injury law in comparative negligence allows the victims of car crashes to recover damages even if they are partially at fault. Of course, any degree of fault will proportionally lower the amount you’re eligible for. You may want to consult with an attorney about your case.