You can break car accident statistics down in a variety of ways, and they all tell a different story. Looking at the time of day can show when it is safest to drive, for instance, while looking at the type of vehicle can show you the safest type of car to buy the next time you’re in the market.

Today, let’s just take a look at the accident rates for various age groups. The American Automotive Association  (AAA) Foundation has compiled the number of fatal accidents per 100 million miles driven for each age group as of 2015, (the last date for which they are readily available):

  1. Drivers from 16 to 17: 3.9 fatal crashes
  2. Drivers from 18 to 19: 2.5 fatal crashes
  3. Drivers from 20 to 24: 2.3 fatal crashes
  4. Drivers from 25 to 29: 2.0 fatal crashes
  5. Drivers from 30 to 39: 1.0 fatal crashes
  6. Drivers from 40 to 49: 1.0 fatal crashes
  7. Drivers from 50 to 59: 1.1 fatal crashes
  8. Drivers from 60 to 69: 1.0 fatal crashes
  9. Drivers from 70 to 79: 1.9 fatal crashes
  10. Drivers who are 80 years old and older: 4.0 fatal crashes

This last statistic is the one that really stands out. While it makes sense that younger drivers have higher crash rates due to their inexperience and that these rates would decline as they gain experience, why do the numbers jump back up again for older drivers?

There are a few potential reasons. One could be declining physical and mental abilities that make it harder to drive. Another could be the frailty of the aging body, which makes it more likely that the person will pass away in a crash that a younger person would have survived.

If you are looking for experienced assistance after losing a loved one in an accident at any age, be sure you know about all of the legal options you have.